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8 Ways to capture screenshots on a PC

NOTE: This guide applies to ALL modern versions of Windows: Windows 10, Windows 7 and Windows 8.1. Some of the methods described in our tutorial, work only in one or two of these operating systems. Where that is the case, we appropriately highlight this fact.

1. Use the keyboard shortcut: PrtScn (Print Screen) or CTRL+ PrtScn

The first method is also the best known and it works in all versions of Windows: on your keyboard, press the PrtScn (Print Screen) key or CTRL+PrtScn keys. Windows creates a screenshot of the whole screen and saves it to the clipboard. It is not stored as a file on your hard drive. Then, open an image editing program like Paint and paste the picture from the clipboard. Then, you can save it as a file and even do some basic editing.

Screenshot of Windows Paint ApplicationShortcut: Windows + PrtScn

If you want to take a screenshot of the whole screen and save it as a file on the hard drive, without using any other tools, then press Windows + PrtScn on your keyboard. Windows stores the screenshot in the Pictures library, in the Screenshots folder. The file is named “Screeenshot(number).png,” where the number will vary based on how many screenshots you have taken.

Screenshot of entire PC Screen

In Windows 10, you can also find your screenshots if you use the Photos app, by going to “Folders -> Pictures -> Screenshots.”

Screen shot of Windows 10 option
3. Use the keyboard shortcut: Alt + PrtScn

In Windows, you can also take screenshots of the active window. Open the window that you want to capture and press Alt + PrtScn on your keyboard. The screenshot is saved to the clipboard. Open Paint or any other photo editing software and paste the image so that you can edit it and save it to your Windows computer or device.

Screenshot of the Active Window

If you have a laptop, a tablet or a keyboard with the Fn key, do this instead of the first three methods:

The first three methods should work perfectly well on desktop computers with Windows or on Windows devices with a standard keyboard. However, if you have a laptop or a convertible device with a Fn key, then the PrtScn key will do other things too, not just take screenshots. Therefore, when you press the PrtScn key, it will not take a screenshot. Instead, use one of the following keyboard shortcuts:

Fn + PrtScn – makes a screenshot of the whole screen and copies it to the clipboard. It is the equivalent of pressing the standard PrtScn key.
Fn + Windows + PrtScn – takes a screenshot of the whole screen and saves it as a file on the hard drive, without using any other tools. Windows stores the screenshot in the Pictures library, in the Screenshots folder. It is the same as pressing Windows + PrtScn on a standard keyboard.
Fn + Alt + PrtScn – takes a screenshot of the active window. It is the equivalent of pressing Alt + PrtScn on a standard keyboard.
Picture of Keyboard with described buttons highlighted

On some keyboards, the PrtScn button might not perform two or more actions. However, it won’t work until you press Fn lock key. On such keyboards, the Fn key works as a lock for the function and multimedia keys on the top, including the Print Screen key.

If you have such a keyboard, press the Fn key to unlock the top row of keys and then use the shortcuts we described in the first three sections of this article. They should work now.

Picture of Keyboard with described button highlighted

If you have a Surface or Surface Pro tablet from Microsoft with Windows 10, you need to use completely different keyboard shortcuts, because there is no PrtScn key on the Type Cover. Instead, Microsoft offers the following Surface-device specific shortcuts for Windows 10:

Fn + Spacebar – saves an image of your current screen to the clipboard, so that you can paste it into any application. It is the equivalent of pressing the standard PrtScn key.
Fn + Alt + Spacebar – saves a screenshot of the active window, to the clipboard, so that you can paste it into any application. It is the equivalent of pressing the Alt + PrtScn keyboard shortcut.
Picture of Keyboard with described buttons highlighted

4. Use the keyboard shortcut: Windows + Shift + S (Windows 10 only)

If you use Windows 10, press Windows + Shift + S to capture a region of your screen and copy it to your clipboard. After you press Windows + Shift + S, the screen is dimmed, and a cursor is shown, that you can use to draw on the screen the region that you want to capture in a screenshot. Draw the area that you want to capture and release the mouse cursor.

The screenshot is saved to the clipboard. Open Paint or any other photo editing app and paste the screenshot so that you can edit it and save it. This feature was originally part of OneNote 2016 but has been added to Windows 10 itself, which is great.

5. Use the Snipping Tool

The Snipping Tool is a great desktop app for taking screenshots. It can create all kinds of screenshots, and you can also use it to do some light editing. Search for the words “snipping tool” in the Start Menu search box (if you use Windows 10 or Windows 7) or on the Start screen (if you use Windows 8.1) and click or tap on the appropriate search result.

Screenshot of snipping tool

To learn how to use it, read this tutorial: How To Take Screenshots With The Snipping Tool In Windows.

6. Take screenshots on a Surface tablet or any other Windows tablet

If you have a Windows tablet, like a Microsoft Surface or an ASUS Vivotab or a Dell Venue, then you won’t have a keyboard with a PrtScn key available. Yes, you can use the Snipping Tool, but that’s not great on a device with touch. The best solution is to use the hardware buttons available on your tablet. On most (if not all) Windows tablets, you can take full-screen screenshots by pressing the Windows logo and the Volume Down key at the same time.

Screenshot of described capturing method on a touch device

You will see the screen getting darker when you do this. This signals that a screenshot was made. You will find the screenshot in your Pictures library, in the Screenshots folder.

7. Take screenshots with the Share charm (Windows 8.1 only)

Windows 8.1 has improved the Charms concept from Windows 8, and they can also be used to take and share screenshots. This guide shares how they work: Introducing Windows 8.1: How to Share Screenshots from Any App

Screenshot of Share Charm on Windows 8.1 only

If you would like to learn more about the Charms, read this guide: Introducing Windows 8.1: What are the Charms & How to Use them.

8. Use the keyboard shortcut: Windows + Alt + PrtScn (Windows 10 Creators Update only)

In Windows 10 Creators Update, Microsoft has introduced new features for gamers, including a new Game Bar that can be used when playing games of all kinds. You can read more about it, here: What is Game Mode and how to use it in Windows 10?.

One of the things you can do with this Game Bar is take screenshots of the active game window. While playing a game, press the keys Windows + Alt + PrtScn, and a screenshot is automatically created and stored on your Windows 10 computer or device.

The screenshot is saved in your Videos library, in the Captures folder. Its filename will include the name of the game that you are playing and the date and time when the screenshot was made.


Tutorial written by Ciprian Adrian Rusen on Digital Citizen

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Create Audio Recordings Using the Canvas Rich Content Editor

Above is a general video about the Rich Content Editor. 

The Rich Content Editor is the toolbar where you find often-used tools and features. You will recognize this rich content editor as it resembles the toolbar from almost any application that you’ve used. The Rich Content Editor in Canvas gives you access to the Media Recorder, which will enable you to record audio or video directly into your Canvas course wherever you see the Rich Content Editor. Which is virtually everywhere in Canvas. 

Below is a specific tutorial about the Media Recorder. 

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Create Short Videos Using the Canvas Rich Content Editor

Above is a general video about the Rich Content Editor. 

The Rich Content Editor is the toolbar where you find often-used tools and features. You will recognize this rich content editor as it resembles the toolbar from almost any application that you’ve used. The Rich Content Editor in Canvas gives you access to the Media Recorder, which will enable you to record audio or video directly into your Canvas course wherever you see the Rich Content Editor. Which is virtually everywhere in Canvas. 

Below is a specific tutorial about the Media Recorder. 

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Canvas: Embedding Video into Your Course

You can embed video from most websites on the internet easily and elegantly in your Canvas course. This is the preferred way to provide video content within Canvas, as opposed to uploading the video to your Files area and linking to it from a page or module.

PROS to Embedding

  1. Video playback is more reliable
  2. Video does not use up file storage space in your course’s File Tab
  3. Video player typically has added functionality such as fullscreen, captions, etc.

CONS to Embedding

  1. If the owner of the video takes it down, your embedded video will no longer be available obviously.

WARNINGIs your video content captioned? If it’s not, you can have it captioned for free!
We strongly recommend this, students with hearing impairments don’t always let faculty know that they need captions, especially in larger classes.

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Adding Video to Powerpoint Presentations

Powerpoint 2016 – Mac & Windows

ResourcesIf you don’t currently own a copy of MS Office 2016, all UT instructors, staff, and students can download it for free here.

Don’t want to upgrade? No problem. Below is a tutorial for Powerpoint 2013.

Powerpoint 2013 – Mac & Windows

Adding video to Powerpoint with this version of Powerpoint—that is to say embedding video from YouTube—involves changing the URL (web address) of the video so that Powerpoint will recognize it as an embed code. If this seems too complicated to you, we recommend you download the latest version of the Microsoft Office Suite using the link in the Resources tab above.

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Lucidpress: Graphic Design & Layout made simple

Lucidpress is a free, robust graphic and graphic design suite that doesn’t require you download an app or have extensive prior knowledge of graphic design principles or graphic design software. (If you have either, however, that will make an easy learning curve that much easier.)

Graphics or documents you design in Lucidpress can be exported for web or print and collaborative work is easy to set up as well.

Resources

To open a free account and get started on your design project, visit their website.

Here is a link to Lucidpress’s Tutorial channel on YouTube.

 

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Grab Attention with High-Resolution Royalty-Free Photos


There are many royalty-free websites that feature high resolution photographs and images of other types such as gifs, videos, illustrations, etc.

Unsplash (featured in the video above) and Shopify are both wonderful resource that offers high definition, large-format photographs for your use. Their repositories of stock images is constantly expanding, so if you can’t find what  you’re looking for the first time, we recommend stopping back. Pixabay also offers gifs, videos, and illustrations, although some of their content is not free. 

Note: Even though this content is free, we highly recommend giving the photographers credit for their images and, fi you feel comfortable doing so, including a link to the repository where you found the photo to help foster traffic to these websites. 

ResourcesTo check out Unsplash and learn more about their offerings, visit their site.

To check out Shopify and learn more about their offerings, visit their site.

To check out Pixabay and learn more about their offerings, visit their site.

 

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Captioning Your Video

Imagine that you’re watching a video on this site and the most crucial part of the video is inaudible or muffled or you just can’t understand what the person is saying? Wouldn’t it be nice to have captions that could clarify the mystery?

Why Use Captions?


Also, it’s the law

Icon of JusticeIf you’re posting video in a public forum, your video content must be captioned by law: Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act requires all media used or purchased by public agencies receiving federal/state funds be accessible. This also applies to online videos. Not only does captioning videos ensure UT is in compliance with federal legislation, it also ensures that everyone has access to the content.

Where to Get Video Captioned

Closed Caption LogoThe UT Libraries offers captioning and transcription service that are FREE to instructors who need course materials captioned or students who request captioning for course materials that are not already captioned. This captioning is done manually by human beings, which makes the accuracy rate very high.

For all other customers and projects, captioning services are $1.00 per minute.

 

WARNINGDO NOT USE TRANSCRIPTION SERVICES OFFERED BY YouTube!

These captioning services—and other machine rendered services like it— are only 60%-70% accurate.

 

ResourcesRequest captioning or for more information, contact the Captioning & Transcription Services.

 

 

 

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